Choose one topic from the four below to do. 1. Compare and contrast the characte

Choose one topic from the four below to do.
1. Compare and contrast the characters of Blanche DuBois in A Streetcar Named Desire and Mary Tyrone in Long Day’s Journey into Night. How does each woman regard her past, and how does the past affect her in the present? What is each woman’s strategy for dealing with the pain of living? In what ways is each one governed by her illusions? To what extent is each woman responsible (or not responsible) for her current problems?
2. Compare and contrast the ways in which social class is represented in A Streetcar Named Desire and Long Day’s Journey into Night. Discuss the ways in which various characters feel excluded from society. What are the social standards by which the characters judge themselves and one another? What, within the worlds of these two plays, are the definitions of success and failure?
3. Although all the main characters in both A Streetcar Named Desire and Long Day’s Journey into Night may be described as “white,” ethnic differences matter in both plays. How is Stanley Kowalski affected by his being Polish? Why does it matter that the Tyrones are Irish? What requirements of “whiteness” are necessary in these plays for one to feel like a full member of society? In what ways are some forms of whiteness privileged over others?
4. Stanley Kowalski and James Tyrone both try to assert authority as heads of their respective households. Neither man is wholly successful. How does each character try to exercise control, and what are the reasons for his failure?

“Write an essay (with introduction and conclusion) on the suggested topic. Your

“Write an essay (with introduction and conclusion) on the suggested topic.
Your introduction should include the thesis statement – main idea of the paper (here is more detailed explanation – https://essayshark.com/blog/how-to-write-a-thesis-statement-to-make-it-clear/). Don’t include any new information in the conclusion. It should  restate the thesis statement of the paper.
Support your ideas with relevant arguments and examples (in-text citations). List 2-3 sources in the references. Make sure you stick to a required formatting style. Get benefits of these sources citationmachine.net and easybib.com.
MLA format – https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/01/ https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/research_and_citation/mla_style/mla_formatting_and_style_guide/mla_in_text_citations_the_basics.html”

“Write an essay (with introduction and conclusion) on the suggested topic. Your

“Write an essay (with introduction and conclusion) on the suggested topic.
Your introduction should include the thesis statement – main idea of the paper (here is more detailed explanation – https://essayshark.com/blog/how-to-write-a-thesis-statement-to-make-it-clear/). Don’t include any new information in the conclusion. It should  restate the thesis statement of the paper.
Support your ideas with relevant arguments and examples (in-text citations). List 2-3 sources in the references. Make sure you stick to a required formatting style. Get benefits of these sources citationmachine.net and easybib.com.
MLA format – https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/01/ https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/research_and_citation/mla_style/mla_formatting_and_style_guide/mla_in_text_citations_the_basics.html”

Write an essay (with introduction and conclusion) on the suggested topic. Your i

Write an essay (with introduction and conclusion) on the suggested topic.
Your introduction should include the thesis statement – main idea of the paper (here is more detailed explanation – https://essayshark.com/blog/how-to-write-a-thesis-statement-to-make-it-clear/). Don’t include any new information in the conclusion. It should  restate the thesis statement of the paper.
Support your ideas with relevant arguments and examples (in-text citations). List 2-3 sources in the references. Make sure you stick to a required formatting style. Get benefits of these sources citationmachine.net and easybib.com.
MLA format – https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/01/ https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/research_and_citation/mla_style/mla_formatting_and_style_guide/mla_in_text_citations_the_basics.html

Notice how much information one young woman gives out in less than 2 minutes. Wh

Notice how much information one young woman gives out in less than 2 minutes. What in human EGOs’ loves to be flattered and inflated?
Think about what it is to be targeted for a “cult”. Why has the word, Cult, taken on negative connotations?
How are specific agendas attached to the term cult(s).
As you view this video write a paragraph on how you perceive the questions listed above – through a SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY lens – and how it felt to view this media. How do you think Social Psychology will assist defusing Cult behaviors in our contemporary world during these challenging times

Read the poem below, research the mythical narrative of Icarus, and answer the f

Read the poem below, research the mythical narrative of Icarus, and answer the following questions on this thread:
Musee des Beaux Arts
W. H. Auden
About suffering they were never wrong,
The old Masters: how well they understood
Its human position: how it takes place
While someone else is eating or opening a window or just walking dully along;
How, when the aged are reverently, passionately waiting
For the miraculous birth, there always must be
Children who did not specially want it to happen, skating
On a pond at the edge of the wood:
They never forgot
That even the dreadful martyrdom must run its course
Anyhow in a corner, some untidy spot
Where the dogs go on with their doggy life and the torturer’s horse
Scratches its innocent behind on a tree.
In Breughel’s Icarus, for instance: how everything turns away
Quite leisurely from the disaster; the ploughman may
Have heard the splash, the forsaken cry,
But for him it was not an important failure; the sun shone
As it had to on the white legs disappearing into the green
Water, and the expensive delicate ship that must have seen
Something amazing, a boy falling out of the sky,
Had somewhere to get to and sailed calmly on.
Auden’s poem is a commentary on Breugel’s painting.
1. How do your views of the painting relate to his?
2. After researching the mythical narrative of Icarus, does the painting come into a clearer focus?
3. In comparison, does the poem help to explain the painting or is it an imaginative leap of the poet’s understanding?

Pieter_Bruegel_de_Oude_-_De_val_van_Icarus.jpg Click for more options Complete t

Pieter_Bruegel_de_Oude_-_De_val_van_Icarus.jpg Click for more options
Complete this week’s Journal before starting this assignment.
1. Using “Home Burial” and your answers to this week’s journal, weave a story based on Bruegel’s painting (above) “Landscape with the Fall of Icarus.” Be as imaginative as you want to be. Your “narrative” should be written in free verse (see my video for “Writing Narrative Poems”: https://vimeo.com/manage/videos/663739909/695e9aff0b).
2. Poetry is often the density of the human experience; therefore, heighten the rhetoric of your poem, include details, use figurative language (your five senses), and incorporate ideas and symbolism (concrete images that represent feelings — a heart means “love”).
3. Read aloud. Are there any areas that need editing (language-wise)?
4. Only worry about punctuation if you feel like you have a grasp.

Watch my discussion on “Narrative Poetry” before you start our “Week Two” assign

Watch my discussion on “Narrative Poetry” before you start our “Week Two” assignments: https://vimeo.com/663739909/695e9aff0b (and in “Course Content”)
Take notes!
What is a “narrative poem”? Simply put, a story written in verse.
The idea of telling a story in the form of a poem goes all the way back to our many cultures’ tellings of heroic adventures (a.k.a., “epics”). Many modern versions of “narrative” poetry are more mundane and endeavor, in the form of poetic storytelling, to capture our human experiences.
Read Robert Frost’s poem below and post your thoughts on its meanings. What is the story about? How is it effectively conveyed through poetry as opposed to prose (common writing)? Don’t research your answer online; instead, trust your own interpretive skills. [Pay attention to Frost’s use of dialogue to tell his story.]
Home Burial
BY ROBERT FROST
He saw her from the bottom of the stairs
Before she saw him. She was starting down,
Looking back over her shoulder at some fear.
She took a doubtful step and then undid it
To raise herself and look again. He spoke
Advancing toward her: ‘What is it you see
From up there always—for I want to know.’
She turned and sank upon her skirts at that,
And her face changed from terrified to dull.
He said to gain time: ‘What is it you see,’
Mounting until she cowered under him.
‘I will find out now—you must tell me, dear.’
She, in her place, refused him any help
With the least stiffening of her neck and silence.
She let him look, sure that he wouldn’t see,
Blind creature; and awhile he didn’t see.
But at last he murmured, ‘Oh,’ and again, ‘Oh.’
‘What is it—what?’ she said.
‘Just that I see.’
‘You don’t,’ she challenged. ‘Tell me what it is.’
‘The wonder is I didn’t see at once.
I never noticed it from here before.
I must be wonted to it—that’s the reason.
The little graveyard where my people are!
So small the window frames the whole of it.
Not so much larger than a bedroom, is it?
There are three stones of slate and one of marble,
Broad-shouldered little slabs there in the sunlight
On the sidehill. We haven’t to mind    those.
But I understand: it is not the stones,
But the child’s mound—’
‘Don’t, don’t, don’t, don’t,’ she cried.
She withdrew shrinking from beneath his arm
That rested on the banister, and slid downstairs;
And turned on him with such a daunting look,
He said twice over before he knew himself:
‘Can’t a man speak of his own child he’s lost?’
‘Not you! Oh, where’s my hat? Oh, I don’t need it!
I must get out of here. I must get air.
I don’t know rightly whether any man can.’
‘Amy! Don’t go to someone else this time.
Listen to me. I won’t come down the stairs.’
He sat and fixed his chin between his fists.
‘There’s something I should like to ask you, dear.’
‘You don’t know how to ask it.’
‘Help me, then.’
Her fingers moved the latch for all reply.
‘My words are nearly always an offense.
I don’t know how to speak of anything
So as to please you. But I might be taught
I should suppose. I can’t say I see how.
A man must partly give up being a man
With women-folk. We could have some arrangement
By which I’d bind myself to keep hands off
Anything special you’re a-mind to name.
Though I don’t like such things ’twixt those that love.
Two that don’t love can’t live together without them.
But two that do can’t live together with them.’
She moved the latch a little. ‘Don’t—don’t go.
Don’t carry it to someone else this time.
Tell me about it if it’s something human.
Let me into your grief. I’m not so much
Unlike other folks as your standing there
Apart would make me out. Give me my chance.
I do think, though, you overdo it a little.
What was it brought you up to think it the thing
To take your mother-loss of a first child
So inconsolably—in the face of love.
You’d think his memory might be satisfied—’
‘There you go sneering now!’
‘I’m not, I’m not!
You make me angry. I’ll come down to you.
God, what a woman! And it’s come to this,
A man can’t speak of his own child that’s dead.’
‘You can’t because you don’t know how to speak.
If you had any feelings, you that dug
With your own hand—how could you?—his little grave;
I saw you from that very window there,
Making the gravel leap and leap in air,
Leap up, like that, like that, and land so lightly
And roll back down the mound beside the hole.
I thought, Who is that man? I didn’t know you.
And I crept down the stairs and up the stairs
To look again, and still your spade kept lifting.
Then you came in. I heard your rumbling voice
Out in the kitchen, and I don’t know why,
But I went near to see with my own eyes.
You could sit there with the stains on your shoes
Of the fresh earth from your own baby’s grave
And talk about your everyday concerns.
You had stood the spade up against the wall
Outside there in the entry, for I saw it.’
‘I shall laugh the worst laugh I ever laughed.
I’m cursed. God, if I don’t believe I’m cursed.’
‘I can repeat the very words you were saying:
“Three foggy mornings and one rainy day
Will rot the best birch fence a man can build.”
Think of it, talk like that at such a time!
What had how long it takes a birch to rot
To do with what was in the darkened parlor?
You    couldn’t care! The nearest friends can go
With anyone to death, comes so far short
They might as well not try to go at all.
No, from the time when one is sick to death,
One is alone, and he dies more alone.
Friends make pretense of following to the grave,
But before one is in it, their minds are turned
And making the best of their way back to life
And living people, and things they understand.
But the world’s evil. I won’t have grief so
If I can change it. Oh, I won’t, I won’t!’
‘There, you have said it all and you feel better.
You won’t go now. You’re crying. Close the door.
The heart’s gone out of it: why keep it up.
Amy! There’s someone coming down the road!’
‘    You—oh, you think the talk is all. I must go—
Somewhere out of this house. How can I make you—’
‘If—you—do!’ She was opening the door wider.
‘Where do you mean to go?  First tell me that.
I’ll follow and bring you back by force.  I will!—